INSPECTOR’S REPORTS

CULLYBACKEY BOYS NATIONAL SCHOOL 

INSPECTION REPORT 14TH DECEMBER 1892 (BOYS)

INSPECTOR MR MCENERY

 The teachers are industrious, painstaking and highly efficient and standard of attainment on the whole satisfactory.  The only noticeable defects were those noticed in the Grammar, Geography and Bookkeeping, of the Sixth Class, in the Fifth Class – First Stage Geography and Agriculture and in Agriculture of Fourth Class.

 The discipline and moral tone are excellent.

INSPECTION REPORT 7TH DECEMBER 1894 (BOYS) 

INSPECTOR MR CUSSEN

A very creditable degree of proficiency has been maintained in the First, Second, Third, Fourth and first stage of Fifth and the pupils of the second stage have been fairly well prepared.

The proficiency of the infant and Sixth classes is however low and more than half of the failures of the whole school occur in the latter.  This is due to an injudicious attempt to teach four extra or optional branches within school hours to pupils who attend only moderately well. 

INSPECTOR’S REPORT 10TH DECEMBER 1895 

INSPECTOR MR J.S.CUSSEN 

The answering of the pupils at the examination was very fair and in most respects creditable progress has been made during the past year.  The proficiency of the second stage of Fifth and Sixth classes in Grammar is poor and many pupils though are able to read fairly well, have not the proper knowledge of the subject matter of the lessons.

The minor branches of the programmes such as Mental Arithmetic and the definitions of Grammar and Geography should receive more attention.  Order and discipline are very good, the defects in the proficiency o this school appears to be part due to the prevalence of an epidemic which caused the school to close in Autumn.

DECEMBER 1895

No pupil who is not a Presbyterian is to be permitted to remain present during instruction in the Presbyterian Catechism unless his parents give permission in the usual from.  J.S. Cussen.

CULLYBACKEY BOYS NATIONAL SCHOOL

15TH NOVEMBER 1897 VISITED 10/10.15AM   9.55AM BY SCHOOL TIME

Timetable is not observed, pupils were not at Religious Instruction when I visited and some R.C. and E.C. pupils were present.  Religious Instruction should not be suspended without managers permission and a notification of any change should appear on timetable.  As scholar work was carried on from 9.30am – 10.m and the monitors were engaged in teaching at that time half an hour should be deducted from their work later in the day.

INSPECTORS REPORT 20TH DECEMBER 1897 (BOYS) 

INSPECTOR MR A.N. BONAPARTE-WYSE

The state of this school as to the efficiency of the literary subjects is very satisfactory and creditable to both principal and assistant teachers.  More pupils were examined than in any previous year and they have made good progress in their studies during the year.  In the proficiency in Drawing is very fair, except in Third Class, where it is only moderate.  Order and discipline are very good.

INSPECTOR’S REPORT 19TH DECEMBER 1901 (BOYS) 

The use of India-rubber in drawing should be restricted. Pupils should be trained to draw lines between two fixed points with a single effort.

INSPECTOR’S REPORT 21ST DECEMBER 1903 (BOYS)

INSPECTOR J.A. MAHON

A proper watering can is needed for sweeping the floor which has been badly swept recently.  Dust has been accumulating on the walls and windows.

A towel is needed in the lavatory.

I would recommend the floors to be washed at least once a month and the fine external appearance of the school to belied by a dirty room.

Every pupil in the senior standards should be ready to explain in simple language – and the processes of his work in Arithmetic.  Monitors need teaching on factors in Algebra.

INSPECTORS REPORT 16TH JANUARY 1906 (BOYS) 

INSPECTOR R.W. HUGHES 

The discipline in this large school is not as good as it might be reasonably expected, even allowing for its over crowded state.

Efforts should be made to reduce the noise and confusion that exists at times.  Kindergarten has been introduced and some little progress made.  The excessive use of slates is gradually disappearing though they are still too much in evidence.

INSPECTOR’S REPORT 4TH NOVEMBER 1907 (BOYS) 

110 PRESENT 

I am glad to find that the discipline is something better than formerly.  Should a second classroom be provided the discipline should be better improved.

It is the opinion of the best and most successful teachers of writing that Infant and First class pupils should use paper with comparable wide rulings.  In this school narrow rulings prevail.  Let Mental Arithmatic be systematically taught too avoid too much tablet reading.  I found the boys had the lessons off by note.

There was a good deal of coughing today.  Should not a room be made more comfortable by having a cheerful fire burning.

Could not find set of nature charts to make use of. They are not merely an ornament.

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CULLYBACKEY FEMALE NATIONAL SCHOOL

GENERAL REPORT 8TH & 9TH NOVEMBER 1900

INSPECTOOR :- A.N. BONAPARTE WYSE

This school continues to be conducted with much efficiency and the pupils have made satisfactory progress during the past year.  The chief subjects of the programme are thoroughly well taught, both in the senior and junior classes.

Arithmetic however, shows some deficiencies in Third, Fourth and Fifth classes, and mental calculation needs more attention.  The different  branches of needlework are fairly well taught, but plain sewing might be improved.

Order, discipline and moral tone are very satisfactory.

CULLYBACKEY FEMALE NATIONAL SCHOOL

GENERAL REPORT 21ST & 22ND NOVEMBER 1901

INSPECTOR:- A.N. BONAPART WISE

Progress of Pupils – Good

CULLYBACKEY NATIONAL SCHOOL

GENERAL REPORT 27TH NOVEMBER 1902 

INSPECTOR :- Mr A.B. Gloster

Progress of Pupils – Excellent

Instruction in hand and eye work might with advantage be extended beyond the second standard.

CULLYBACKEY FEMALE NATIONAL SCHOOL 

10TH NOVEMBER 1903

INSPECTOR :- Mr James Mahon 

REPORT OF ANNUAL INSPECTION

The school continues to be conducted in a thoroughly efficient manner in all respects.

BUICK MEMORIAL GENERAL REPORT (GIRLS)

5TH NOVEMBER 1907

INSPECTOR R.W. HUGHES

Again the proficiency of the pupils in the school programme reached a high standard.  The children are bright and intelligent, and take a keen interest in their school work.

The playground might easily be made more attractive by introducing proper flowerbeds.  At present little taste is displayed.

BUICK MEMORIAL GENERAL REPORT (GIRLS)

7TH& 8TH SEPTEMBER 1908 

INSPECTOR :- MR HUGHES

Useful work continues to be done in this large school and some further improvements have taken place.  The playground is not presentable, cookery has been successfully taught, and nature studies have been introduced to the senior standards.

BUICK MEMORIAL GIRLS’ GENERAL REPORT

27TH OCTOBER 1909

INSPECTOR :- MR PEDLOW

This school is doing very god work.  Teachers methods are skilful and they are all interested in the success of the pupils.

The weak subjects were Geography and History.

The main room is not properly heated.

BUICK MEMORIAL GIRLS’ GENERAL REPORT

7TH& 8TH JANUARY 1911

INSPECTOR :- MR HUGHES 

The school continues to be well taught and the proficiency is, generally speaking, of a high order.  During the coming year more attention might be given to history and the time devoted to home lessons should be curtailed.

Fire screens are badly needed for the two class rooms.

BUICK MEMORIAL GIRLS’ GENERAL REPORT

1ST&2ND FEBRUARY 1912

INSPECTOR MR HUGHES

The general proficiency of the standards again reached a high level and reflects credit on the staff.  The Reading, Writing and Singing are especially good.

Fire guards have been provided.

BUICK MEMORIAL GIRLS’ GENERAL REPORT

1ST&2ND APRIL 1913

INSPECTOR :- MR HUGHES

This school continues to be conducted in a very efficient manner.  The pupils are well behaved, attentive and earnest at their work.  The rooms and premises are kept neat and tidy and an excellent tone is apparent throughout the school.

BUICK MEMORIAL GIRLS’ GENERAL REPORT

13TH JANUARY 1914

INSPECTOR :- MR MCGLADE (SENIOR INSPECTOR)

The school is, on the whole, efficiently conducted.  Class discipline is good, and business throughout the lesson intervals is actively carried on.

In English and Needlework very good progress is shown, and in other branches the proficiency is good, except in the drawing of the middle standards which is below good.  A science course suitable for girls might well be taught.

The monitresses should apply themselves far more closely to their studies.  Miss Martin’s answering on course was unsatisfactory.

New maps of the world and Europe are wanted.

BUICK MEMORIAL PRIMARY SCHOOL (GIRLS)

INSPECTORS REPORT 13TH OCTOBER 1914

INSPECTO :- J.M. BRADSHAW

The school continues to make very good progress; the members of staff are energetic and take a praise-worthy interest in their work.  Owing to the want of sufficiently large class rooms, it is very difficult to organize the large junior division.  The removal of the gallery in the classroom and the provision of desks instead would improve the organization.

BUICK MEMORIAL GIRL’S INSPECTORS REPORT

27TH JUNE 1916

INSPECTOR:- MR BRADSHAW

The work of the school is carried on with intelligence and energy.  The general proficiency again reached a high standard and the order and discipline are very satisfactory.  The girls are too slow in answering on the subject matter of reading lessons.

BUICK MEMORIAL PRIMARY SCHOOL (GIRLS)

INSPECTORS REPORT 15TH JANUARY 1917

INSPECTOR :- MR BRADSHAW

The school is in a very satisfactory state. The work is carried on with energy and intelligence, the discipline and order are creditable to the Principal and staff.

Reading is too low as a rule and the teaching of Geography is somewhat mechanical.

The smallness of the classroom is an impediment to the training of the Infants.

BUICK MEMORIAL PRIMARY SCHOOL (GIRLS)

INSPECTOR’S REPORT 27TH SEPTEMBER 1917

INSPECTOR  :- MR O’CONNELL

Steady, earnest work continues to be done in this school, and the proficiency attained is quite satisfactory.  The pupils are well conducted and industrious, but they are somewhat slow and diffident at oral answering.

A more cheerful spirit should be introduced into the tone of the school

BUICK MEMORIAL PRIMARY SCHOOL (GIRLS)

INSPECTORS REPORT 18TH NOVEMBER 1918

INSPECTOR :- MR KEITH

The school is in general very well conducted considering the recent irregular attendance and the small size of the classroom, which makes the organization difficult.  The pupils are trained to be neat in their methods of work, while some of the recitation and the practical subjects, cookery and needlework, are very successfully taught.

The intelligence of the senior pupils might be developed to a greater degree by mental arithmetic and by the oral reproduction of reading matter, and a revision of the organization should render the instruction of the infants and first class more effective, avoiding on the one hand the crowding of the classrooms, and on the other the employment of older pupils as teachers of the younger children.

BUICK MEMORIAL PRIMARY SCHOOL (GIRLS)

INSPECTOR’S REPORT 3RD&4TH SEPTEMBER 1919

INSPECTOR :- A.E. CARTER

Sound and useful work continues to be done in this school and gratifying progress has been made since the last inspection particularly in written English and Needlework.

The organization of work, however is still unsatisfactory, and the pupils of the upper standards are constantly left to their own devices while the Principal is teaching the Junior division in another room.  A redistribution of teachers and re-grouping of standards should remedy this.  More attention of oral English is necessary in the middle and upper divisions of the school if the mark in that subject is to be retained, and better methods of teaching drawing should be adopted by the Principal and second assistant.

In general it must be said that the members of the staff are hard working and industrious and the pupils polite and well behaved.

Records in PRONI   researched by Elizabeth Boyd

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INSPECTORS REPORTS FOR CULLYBACKEY PRIMARY SCHOOL

10/10/1921

General Inspection                                 104 Pupils present

ORAL ENGLISH

Oral Expression in infants requires additional attention. Train children to answer in short complete sentences, and also, to reproduce short stories fairly consecutively. Recitation should be slower and more deliberate in style. In standard 1 give due care to explanation of difficult words and passages, oral reproduction of the subject matter of the reading lesson by the children and to spelling

ARITHMATIC

Tables, in general, require to be visited. Infants and Std1 will require careful attention in this subject. Give more practise in mental problems in Std 2 and Std 5

DRAWING

From the very beginning train the children to hold ‘crayon’ or chalk with the proper grip

SINGING

Teacher should not accompany children in the junior group. If necessary sing a pattern for them  which they can copy

Attend to posture of children at desk, work in Junior room particularly, they are inclined to lean too much over their work

Do not retain, unduly, children over 8 years of age in infant class.

P S Marshall

07/11/1921

Visited 1.10.-2.30 pm                             109 present

1  The juniors do not hold the pen well, their writing should have a different style.

2  Do not rely too much on memorising names in the teaching of geography. Geography of Europe is good

                                                                                          J M Bradshaw

01/05/1922

 Visited 2.10-2.30

                                                                                         W McMillan

04/09/1922

Visited 10.40-12.40   04/09/1922

1     Miss Marshalls notings I have marked still apply. I insist on young children speaking out distinctly and giving full answers.

Tables of Std1 will require careful teaching as will spelling of senior Infants

  2    Children should be trained to hold the pen or pencil properly. They should to write or draw with  ?? on.  The copy book should be kept properly to the right hand of the page

3     Std 4 cannot be profitably employed at silent reading

4   Teach senior pupils to look for and see the neatest methods in working sums

                                                        W MacMillan

22/12/1922

9.50-3.10        General Inspection

1 Very good work generally is being done. Train the infants to answer their names clearly and loudly.

2   In Std1 a considerable number of pupils write with the side of the pen

3  More slope should improve the writing of the senior

4  There are too many divisions of the infants for reading

5   The pencil drawings of Std1 are too carefree

                                                                           J M Bradshaw

25/09/1923

9.50-3.20                   Special Inspection

1  Recitation  (Infants)            should be slower and more distinct

2   The writing might be more compact and shaped more

3   Practise drawing from memory and imaginative drawing

4  Bags should be left  ?? off morning lessons

                                                                          J M Bradshaw

20/03/1924

2.25-3.50                118 pupils present

Suggestions

1 In compiling the monitors criticism lesson notes train her to append a prospective Blackboard sketch. This will give power and proportion in the blackboard work

2  Train her more intensively also in the keeping of the account books

                                                                    J M Bradshaw

08/08/1924

1.15-3.10

1  Silent reading is not advisable in the case of Standards below 5th

2  Teach the more important dates in history and revise frequently

3 Give plenty of simple practical questions  in mental arithmetic

4  Aim at more tasteful recitation by infants with more marked voice reflection and some appropriate gestures

5   Pupils should not grip the pen lightly with the first finger

                                      W MacMillan

18/09/1924

9.35-10.45                              11 pupils present

Suggestions

1  The inscription “National School” should be altered in accordance with requirements and it is to be hoped that something will be done to improve the playground which is muddy and low lying in front. A heavy layer of broben stones and suitable gravel would improve matters

2   Touch up the blackboards with ink and some preparation

3   Push the senior infants (the best of them) to pen and ink work at writing

4   Provide the minimum 15 daily minutes for infant conversation lessons. I strongly recommend a fresh Blackboard lesson daily illustrated and graded from day to day.

Thereby exciting conversations and suitable phrasing

                                                     E Beamish

13/11/1924

9.20-2.50

    General Inspection

Suggestions Junior Division

1   Free oral answering in full form is a matter still requiring development in the infant section

2    These children too should be pushed ahead at tables and easy number work and

 Std 1 might know more about numeration and notavition

3    Don’t sing with these children at songs. Sing rather for them – and softly and get a more mellor effect — getting them to imitate try “koo-ing” as a correction with them for a time

Middle division.

1    Lift the quality of the reading cutting out the staccato, jerky effect, and give more practise in the oral spelling and recitation

2  Deal practically with essential grammar and analysis

3   More problem in the arithmetic questions calling for keen reflection in regard to applying the ordinary rules taught

Senior Division

1  Rouse the girls to a sense of hearty spontaneous response at oral lessons.  They seem to know more than they tell when questioned.

2    More mental arithmetic involving a keen knowledge of tables.  Introduce the metric system to strengthen decimals which seem shaky

                                                                  E Beamish

18/11/1924

9.40 -10.20

More attention should be paid to the manner in which infants are learning to write. The pen and pencil should not be tightly gripped.  The book should be more to the right and the hand should not rest on the side

                                                      M Macmillan

07/2/1925

   Visited 2  -  3pm    102 present

1   Reading (1st class) try to get a more intelligent expression

2  Give more attention to oral composition

3   Work went on earnestly and efficiently during visit

                                                F B Lavett

17/06/1925

9.35 – 11     BOTH SCHOOLS      117 present

Suggestions

1   Push on with the staff notation in senior singing, and polish off the voices somewhat aiming at rounder softer tone and effect

,2  More freedom in middle division drawing if possible

                                             E Beamish                                                                                   

08/01/1926

9.25- 1.30     BOYS SCHOOL     120 present

Suggestions

1  Senior Drawing   Deal with groups of objects in order to add interest to the studies.  The GIRLS are ready for this work. In the Std 3 &4 the drawing should show much better grading and power

2 Arithmetic  of a practical kind especially oral training in this subject should get more incisive teaching in Std 1.3 and.4

3  Provide at least 60 minutes weekly for hygiene and Temperance and frequently this instruction of subsequent reproduction in the composition

                                                      E Beamish

15/01/1925

1.00-  2.25

Nature study is needing urgent attention

1  An extra half hour weekly should be given in each class

2 The lessons on air and water in Std 4 should be illustrated and experiments

3 Attempt a fuller nature calendar in the senior division

                                                     E G Ingold

12/03/1926

Called 115 present

Suggestions

1   I think 2 hours should be sufficient for needlework  weekly

2   Drawing as opening morning lesson 10-10.30 is scarcely advisable.  Better if it can be done(  conveniently) – to postpone this recreative subject until later in the day when the girls are tiring

                                                         E Beamish

08/06/1926

1.30 -2.10             122 Pupils present

Visited to hear singing.

Miss McWilliams absent

Suggestions

1  More ear tuning of a constructive and interesting kind

2  Push on with the staff notation

                                                               E Beamish     T O’Lomin

09/09/1926   both schools

Work carried on in a nice quiet manner this morning.  Do not get Junior children to ‘count up’ when they miss items on ‘tables’

                                                    J A Cole

27/10/1926

1.45 -3.00                                BOTH SCHOOLS  109 present

Suggestions

1   More than 45 minutes weekly can be provided for Hygiene and Temperance.  Some of the lessons in these subjects, too, will form ideal themes for compositions for girls.

2 The use of the ruler in the sid?? desk Arithmetic will add to the appearance and spacing of figures  Extended addition tables might be freely practise by Senior Infants and Std 1

                                                            E Beamish

01/04/1927

Music

Progress is sound and systematic.  Let the aural training be constructive and develop the power of hearing mentalby . A good selection of songs and song collection will be found in the newly issued supplimentary list of recommended books

                                   T O’Lorrin

23/24/August 1927

9.15 -11.05    1105 – 3,15   119 present

General Inspection

Suggestions

1  Miss Magaw can concentrate more on Infant training – otherwise the work in her class is progressive and pleasing

2  Grammar  can get extra attention in Std 3 &4.  So can the explanation of the reading lessons.  Rouse interest in new words, analyse the spelling of them before the blackboard and have them put in sentences provided by the children themselves

3 Don’t sing with the children – the Juniors so much.  Sing for them if necessary.  Why not a little marching song at class changes in the senior room !!

4 It would be advisable to deal keenly with decimals .  Why postpone this practical feature of mathmatics until the children reach the upper classes

                                         E Beamish

27/10/1927

Needlework

Very good — thorough work is being done in all standards

Suggestions

1  Std 1  to knit on coarser needles

2  Std 1 work to be more gradually graded as discussed

3  Seniors to cut out their own garments themselves and to do all tacking themselves

                                                            E J Harbetty

28/10/1927

 Called     93 present

Suggestion

If necessary and found convenient the divisions of the cookery class in the 1st and 2nd year would be quite judicious otherwise the numbers would be too large for a single room

                                                    E Beamish

09/03/1928

                         98 Pupils

Visited for pupil teaching test.

Under the circumstances next door (Prin Mrs McIlroy absent)  I would like Miss Gore to exercise her judgement and with assists give Mrs McSpadden a hand in conducting the BOYS dept

                                            E Beamish

26/04/1928

12 -12.40  112 pupils

A Pleasing school , do more for narration in the Infant Std

                                     H W Welply

23/10/1928

Music

The classes are newly organised after amalgamation, and there is considerable variety of ability -  this will soon be adjusted after systematic work in line indicated.  The Infants who made their first appearance at the school should be given a grounding as closely on the lines of the ‘Programme’ as possible.  In the upper classes where the teachers are thoroughly conversant with staff, all the eye, voice, and ear correlation may be carried out on a staff modulator, this is notation may be used practically exclusively if so desired. The general; keenness promises very well for the future progress

                                                T O’Lorrin

30/10/1928

9.05 – 10.00     206 present

The outlook in the combined school is now entirely pleasing .  The tone of the classes and their intelligent industry are notable features this morning.,  Neatness is a matter which is getting more prominence than formerly.

I think the continued attendance mat warrant another teacher ,and left, to simplify and intensify the organisation. Principal will please initial the assists schemes of work and preparation notes regularly

                                            E Beamish

20/11/1928

9.20 – 10.40     205 pupils

Miss Williams might make better preparation for her work notes do not compare favourably with those made by other assists.  At least they do not for the last 2 weeks nor have they been initialled  by Mr McIvor in this period.

The school as a whole is doing well under Mr McIvor and I shall look for great things there.

                                            W H Welply

32/11/1928

  8.55 – 9.35

Criticism lesson by P teacher on St Patrick .  These criticism lessons should be done in sets, a set in reading, a set in writing, , Arithmetic, history, geography ,grammar, object lessons etc

                                             W H Welphy

11/12/1928   12/12/1928

9.20 -3.10        9.20 – 2.40                211 pupils

General inspection

Suggestions

1 When reconsidering the time table it maybe well not to take drawing immediately after play

2  In pulling the school on the very high level anticipatd Mrs McSpadden must pull her own oar with more effect by getting better results from infants.  Speaking, reciting, retelling stories in continued form – all need more vital teaching, also tables are poor.  To help, to utilise the little ones more time might be given to games and bright physical exercise.

3  Emphasise Mental Arith. .  Have a good knowledge of tables established in all classes. Std 1 pupils are weak in this subject

4  Keep up the present spirit of progress

                                  E Beamish

19/12/1928

1.35-400

I am glad to see an improved tendency .  I should like to see all classes changes conducted with greater quietness

                                        J A Cole

04/01/1929

1.20.-2.10

Both 1 and 2 classes had practise lessons during my visit today. The results on the work were very satisfactory

Second  year pupils could however be more observant and self reliant at times

                                              E J Marbeth

25/03/1929

Called to examine candidate in teaching

Suggestions

1  In forming questions for examination have an idea of the answer required

2  Be very cautious in abstracting as much as you can in the lesson

3 Examining the school in Arith.  A wise and well arranged test today – needs preserving the actual working.

4  It seems that there is an improvement in the subject already

                                          E Beamish

21/06/1929

Music

In view of the expectations expressed previously.  It is most satisfactory to see how those expectations have been fulfilled.  There is now a well cumulated scheme of instruction, the teaching is of 1st quality and the results are most gratifying.

A good year of work has been done, the pupils are thoroughly alert in everyway and the enthusiasm and efficiency, the teachers are to be congratulated.

                                   T O’Lorrin

28/10/1929

   Visited   226 pupils

Only in the yard are any weaknesses to be noted, they will probably disappear when the school is transferred’  Maintain the present working spirit

                     J G Beamish -

15/08/1930

10.00 – 100pm

Laundry work very satisfactory considering the conditions

Cookery very satisfactory considering the conditions

The teachers have a large class in the room as well as the cookery or laundry pupils.

Suggestion

If a classroom is being enlarged it should be made sufficiently spacious to allow tables to be put up with plenty of floor space for practical work.  The stove moved into that classroom and a sink installed with running water if possible,

                                                E Ross

10/09/1930  /11/9/1930                                                           244 Pupils

General Inspection

The principal and staff have worked diligently and effectively and generally good progress has been made most being shown in much of the work.  I would draw attention to the following points

1    In all classes a further effort is required to get the pupils, especially the boys, to speak more correctly and distinctly

2   Narration should be constantly practised

3   In teaching of grammar a constructive principals is recommended of “The teaching of English in  Primary Schools  ” by treble

“The new English Course ” by Glover

Give frequent practise in the combination of sentences and paragraphing.

4   For initial Arithmetic I would recommend “Progressive Practice in Mental Arithmetic” by Kemp

The pupils are well mannered and there is a pleasing tone.  The personal influence of the principle is very good.

                                                    N. Irwin Brown

                                                     Whitehead Hotel, Whitehead

13/02/1931

Miss Carson’s Work

1   Avoid talking too much – the less said by the teacher often the more heard by the children.

2   Points in handling of Physical Training was discussed

3   Methods of securing “Phrasing” in early stages as demonstrated.

Miss Carson’s preparation is regular and her work in general gives good promise for young

                                              N I brown

23/03/1931

Music

The standard is well maintained and more  important the enthusium and general love of the art is very evident .  It is most satisfactory to find a good pianoforte in the school, this will be a great  help in presenting those aspects of the subject which lie outside actual vocalisation.  Note Miss Carson’s work is entirely promising – she has good ideas and can evidently ensure that they will be carried on.

                                               T O’ Lorrin

03/04/1931

Cookery and Laundry work continues to be satisfactory.  Needlework Seniors Std 5-8 in charge of Ms McSpadden are doing very good work.

Cutting out is treated on good lines here with most successful results.

                                                            E Ross

29/11/1932

Incidental Visit

Cookery progressing very satisfactorally.

When reconstruction is being done to the buildings, a sink with running water should be installed in the room to be used for cooking if possible. I am very pleased to see a sewing machine in use her.

                                               E Ross

09/05/1933

Laundry work very good has been done during this course. Miss Megaw in charge for the class today

                                                     E Ross

14/06/1933

Music

The singing is attractive and sensitive songs are good style and sight reading promises well.. The seniors today read simple staff sight tests with ease and accuracy.  In the junior classes let the vocalisation be smooth and continuous, there is a tendency to syllabic utterance which is checking the rhythmic flow of phrase.  This may be cured by a course of phrase imitation with an understanding of the importance connected.

                                                            T O’Lorrin

07/12/1933

General Inspection

1      Infant class is somewhat depleted at present owing to illness among the pupils and was not well represented

2    Encourage the senior pupils to read more for themselves and to answer orally with greater freedom and confidence.

3    Make use of correlation of subjects to a judicious extent

4   Train the 7th Std to understand the nature of an equation in Algebra and how to build one up from data supplied

                                                       W W Dunlop

12/02/1934

Cooking very satisfactory.  The stove is in very bad working order and should be replaced by a larger one as soon as possible

                                                 E Ross

28/09/1934

Miss O’Neill’s work

1 Avoid repeating children’s statements — throw the ones off making himself audible and intelligible to his group and the child himself

2  Repetition of one phrase without variation for a whole page of  penmanship is resulting in careless  Std 3  other methods suggested

3    I would like to see Miss O’Neill apply some of the instruction she received in college to the teaching of beginners reading.  Method observed – teaching names of letters first – is not recommended

4    Avoid abstract generalisations in Nature Study with Std 1.   Work  should be mainly with the range of childness observation

                                                         A C Young

18/10/1934

1    Mr Watt who has charge of Std 4 teachers with energy and success.  In the matter of preparation I have noted where improvements could be affected

2 Miss O’Neill must endeavour to interest her junior pupils and so get their attention for the lesson in hand.  Suggestions as a method of teaching reading have been made (in introductory lesson for Junior Infants)

3   Expect from the pupils at the written lessons a reasonable amount of well formed writing.  Deal with the weaker pupils and general errors as indicated.

4    Make the daily preparations really useful and helpful

                                                       W W Dunlop

04/09/1935

 Examined the work of Mr Watt

                                                    S Kirkpatrick

08/02/1937

Inspected the work of Miss McCracken

                                              S Kirkpatrick

22/06/1937

Music

The singing of the senior classes is most sensitive and flexible.  Tone is clear and well controlled and diction is crisp and clean.  The only thing lacking is vocal ‘colour’ .  Try to use exactly the right colour of voice for every idea – for on this depends the impression of sincerity and fitness.

                                                          L Andell

31/10/1938

Very pleased to visit the school again after so many years and find everything in such a satisfactory state.

                                     A N Bonaparte Wyse

                                         Secretary of Ministry of  Education

17/01/1939

Cookery 1 & 2 classes had practical work today.  Miss McCracken has made a very promising beginning with the teaching of this subject

                                         M C  Henry

05/02/1938

Mr Watt Std 4 & 5.  See that all contribute to the talk.    Sleepers serve only on the railway track.

                              John D MacManus

08/11/1939

 Diploma for Mr Wylie

  Train junior pupils to tell funny stories

                                        John D MacManus

04/03/1940

   Cookery and Laundry

Discussed needlework with Mrs McSpadden  and Miss McCracken.  Very satisfactory work being done

                                                E Ross

12/06/1944

Position at desk work and grip of pen require attention throughout the school.

Regular practise in recitation and poetry should be taken with every class.

The children’s voices should be heard often and more clearly.

                               A C Young

05/10/1946

Physical Training

Useful work is being done and a new spirit is evident .  The progressive scheme based on the 1933 syllabus as discussed should be developed throughout the school.

                                                          L Hogg

2/05/1947

                      Visited re meals scheme.

                                                          D Garry

16/05/1947

Physical  Training. Good work has been done with Infants and Std 1. Re-organisation of this subject in the upper school has not been successful’

Suggested

  Infants   Mrs McSpadden

  Std 1      Miss Mccracken

  Std 2 & 3 Mrs Mcspadden

  Std  3 &4  Miss McCracken

Std 5,6 7 Girls  Mr Watt

               Boys   W Davison

                                              L R Hogg

 30/10/1947

 Physical Training

Boys side of the playground is in a dangerous condition and needs to be resurfaced

                                               L B Dickinson

29/09/1948

P T.  Progress made Std 6,7 boys . All practices should be purposeful.  More use might be made of team leaders

                                             L B Dickinson

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CRAIGS PAROCHIAL SCHOOL

GENERAL REPORT 14&15th MARCH 1922

INSPECTOR:- MR W. MACMILLAN (SENIOR INSPECTOR)

Good progress was made in the junior division except in Reading, which should receive special attention.  The master’s work had been efficient in the main, but little was known of history, and there was room for a good deal of improvement in the case of geography of Third Standard and Arithmetic of Fourth.

CRAIGS PAROCHIAL SCHOOL

GENERAL REPORT 10TH NOVEMBER 1922

INSPECTOR:- J.M. BRADSHAW

Good progress has been made in both divisions of the school.  The proficiency is uniformly good and in Arithmetic and Singing a higher standard has been reached this year.  The senior pupils should be encouraged to express themselves more freely.  The subject matter of the reading lessons should be discussed with them.

CRAIGS PAROCHIAL SCHOOL

GENERAL REPORT 10TH JULY 1923 

INSPECTOR:- MR J.M. BRADSHAW

Good work is done in both divisions of the school. The pupils have a sound knowledge of the different subjects taught.  Special attention should be paid to recitation in the upper standards, a more deliberate and expressive style should be cultivated.

Singing has been taught very successfully.

CRAIGS PAROCHIAL SCHOOL

GENERAL REPORT 18TH SEPTEMBER 1924 

INSPECTOR:- F.G. BEAMISH

In an undemonstrative but capable manner the Principal gets creditable results.  With the exception of Arithmetic, which is only fair, the general proficiency in his classes is quite sound, and his school keeping is regular and careful and shows upward tendency.

The defect in Arithmetic is largely traceable to a want of incisive treatment of this subject by the Junior Assistant Mistress in her division, especially in the case of Infants whose oral answering is not properly developed.  Junior drawing too, does not satisfy but otherwise this teacher is giving efficient service and her former rating is continued with the hope that the defects will be remedied.

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INSPECTION BOOK

August 1859    School too small for attendance
August 1862    School too small
August 1863    House in good repair
June 1864       Strict order should be enforced.  Room too small.
A supply required, Ink, pencils and slates much needed
21/06/1871    A Roman Catholic child aged 6 years named Dan O’Boyle attended Religious Instruction without a certificate.  The teacher is in training and thought as his older brother and sister attended without a certificate that in this case such was not wanted. Religious denominations should be fully written opposite each name in the register Rolls should contain the religious denominations of each. All should be neatly kept Saturdays attendance should always be entered when school is open.

Teacher George Neely in Dublin training school, Andrew Moore is his substitute. George Neely resigned 09/09/1871 Francis Speers Appointed 11/09/1871.

08/05/1872 The board has decided that the mother of a pupil cannot give a certificate for Religious Instruction if the father is alive and available.

23/03/1874    90 pupils
This is impossible to maintain proper order in a house too much overcrowded.Court rules to be obtained and suspended.

02/08/1875  Visited incidentally 21/24 present at 11am. One absent marked present, and another boy attending for a few days but not on roll counted in his place  Several pupils over age on the infants roll and several others on wrong class roll.
Ed  MacCrednor ??

14/09/1877    The state of proficiency is extremely defective in all classes and grants should not be continued unless decided improvement be secured

09/09/1886  The teacher has discharged his duties during the past year with pretty fair success and the proficiency of the pupils is considerably improved.  The proficiency of Infant, First and Second classes is good of all the other classes bad in Grammar and Geography, and very fair in other respects. Discipline and moral tone satisfactory.

Mr Starrit   District Inspector

22/09/1896    Sixty pupils were present at the Results Examination, and the fact that all these had to be prepared in a room which affords accommodation for only thirty-seven may account for some of the defects which exist in the proficiency and organization of the school. The pupils are backward in Reading and Explanation, Grammar and Agriculture, and many failed in Geography and Arithmetic also.The written exercises are very deficient in neatness and cleanliness, and should receive greater attention during the next year. Fair progress has been made in Needlework since its introduction, five months ago. The demeanour of most of the pupils is dull and apathetic, and many of them speak in a hardly intelligible manner.

Mr Cussen     District Inspector

24/09/1897    This school is not conducted successfully, and the pupils’ answering as well as their demeanour at the examinations gave little indication of intellectual development.
The proficiency in Reading is very poor. Several pupils are unable to read with accuracy, and few have a fair comprehension of the subject-matter of the lessons. The proficiency in Writing, Grammar, and Geography is very poor. More attention should be paid to order and discipline.It is very desirable  that the new school should be built as soon as possible, as the accommodation afforded by the existing house is wholly insufficient for the number of pupils in attendance.

(Signed)   J S Cussen   District Inspector

Action Ordered On Report:-
Manager is requested to admonish Mr Russell on the low proficiency
of his pupils in Reading, Writing, Grammar and Geography.

28/05/1901    There were serious defects in writing of the 2nd and 4th standards and in Arithmetic.  Reading is not clear and it is wanting in expression and intelligence.  The chief cause of the falling off is the considerable increase in the attendance during the last 4 to 5 months of this period.

09/1904    Notes.  Neither of the teachers should take yes and no without Sir or Miss for an answer.  A little perseverance by the teachers in this will surely have a good result.

J Mac Mohoney

1906            74 present

24/04/1913    W R Hughes
Little or on improvement has taken place during the past year except that the children appear to be better under control.  They, however are not as neat and tidy as could be wished.  The assistant should endeavour both by precept and example to impress upon the juniors the necessity of coming to school clean and neat.

30/01/1919    Whitewashing has not been done since 1913.  The out offices need whitewashing.
J M Bradshaw

02/04/1920    School is conducted with efficiency and in general a good standard is attained by pupils.  Geography teaching in the senior division and explanation of Reading lessons in the junior division need increased attention. The teachers show more care and taste in the keeping of this new vested school.
M Mahon

09/07/1924    Remarks
The class room (gallery) is too small to accommodate one teacher section of the school, the removal of the gallery and substitution of 9 dual desks would be a temporary improvement pending the establishment of the new act. The inscription “National School” should be altered and boundary wall needs pointing.  The out offices need cleaning and deodorising the playground should be kept free of weeds, a fibre doormat is needed.  There are no infant desks.
F G Beamish

19/09/1927    Remarks
Classroom is too small.  I understand the Regional Committee proposes to extent it.  The gable wall of school needs to be replaced in parts,  the coping of playground wall requires repair, the playground is rather muddy in wet weather. Two easels are needed,  there is no map of the British Isles.
J A Cole

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DUNMINNING NATIONAL SCHOOL

General Report  7th March 1907

Inspector R W Hughes

Principal James McClenghen joined school 22nd February 1903

Junior Teacher   Matilda Wiseman   joined school 1st September 1904

This school has been very well conducted during the year, all the requirements of the New Code being carried out.

The proficiency in Writing is excellent, this subject is skillfully taught to the juniors.

Exercises in Kindergarten and object lessons are successfully given to the juniors by the mistress.

Discipline is well maintained in the classroom and premises are kept clean and neat.

I am glad to find that the defects pointed out last inspection in connexion with the out offices have been remedied

GENERAL VISIT       10 th September 1909     66 present

A very good start has been made this new school year

                                 R    W  Hughes

GENERAL INSPECTION  1st November 1910

10.30am -  01.15 pm

Although the reading of the seniors is, as a rule, fluent, the children fail to speak out loudly enough.

The needlework is very good.  I was glad to see that speciems were sent to the Ballymena Exhibition.  Next year perhaps more can be sent.

                                            R W HUGHES

GENERAL INSPECTION   12th February 1912  from 10.30am – 01.15 pm

I found satisfactory progress has been made in all the subjects that came under my observation today.  The proficiency in Arithmetic of V and V1 was very good.  The Reading 111, 1V, V,V1 is clear and loud. Analysis of simple sentences is well taught.

The premises are carefully looked after by the Assistant, the conduct, general appearance and manners of the pupils are all that can be desired.  See that the fireguard is used in the main room.

I was glad to be able to note and report that several prizes in Writing and  Needlework were won by the pupils at Ballymena  Exhibition during the past year.

                                 R W Hughes

GENERAL INSPECTION  12th January 1914 10.00am – 03.10pm

1        In drawing of 5th and 6th pupils seem to be too timid in sweeping out the lines, in 3rd and 4th work lines might be uniform – not thick and thin.

2        Progress in Geography so far slow.  Better to begin the geography with a country or district with the physical features – mountains and rivers.

3        Reading very good on the whole – 1st class boys are the most backward in the subject.  They read feeblely.

4        Infants training rather meagre but the desks are very unsuitable for the occupants.

5        Spacious classrooms with suitable floor and furniture are wanted there and map of Ireland and music sheets might be provided.

6         Complete the progress records also entries in Register Books

                                 P J McQuade

INSPECTION  22nd September 1914

Earnest and intelligent work is done in this school, the written exercises are neatly done.

I find the children rather slow in answering, special attention should be paid to the oral composition lessons.  The children should be taught to most of the talking and simultaneous answering should be accepted.  Arithmetic – Teach addition and subtraction together as explained

House

1 The class room is quite too small

2  A boarded floor is very desirable

3 The desks are unsuitable , they are much too high for the younger children and   the seats are too far away

4 The Inscription Board is almost overgrown with ivy.

J M Bradshaw

SCHOOL VISIT  20th January 1919

Infants should speak out more distinctly when repeating rhymes.

Arm exercises should be taught at drill.

History. A time chart would be useful for teaching dates.  It is desirable to teach the history of the war in connexion with the map of Europe.

J M Bradshaw

GENERAL REPORT 28TH NOVEMBER 1921

INSPECTOR:- MR J.M. BRADSHAW

The work done in the upper division of the school is very satisfactory and in the lower good progress has been made.  The recitation should be more expressive and oral expression might be freer in the Infants’ class.  Mental arithmetic should have special attention in Fourth standard.

DUNMINNING NATIONAL SCHOOL

GENERAL REPORT 8TH JULY 1922

INSPECTOR:- W. MACMILLAN

The school continues to be well conducted, the principal teacher’s work being highly efficient – Needlework was very good.

The Senior Infants should make better progress and a higher quality of work aimed at in Reading and Arithmetic.

Order was very good.

DUNMINNING SCHOOL

GENERAL REPORT 11&13TH SEPTEMBER 1923 

INSPECTOR:- J.M. BRADSHAW

Very good progress is being made in the Senior Division of the school. The juniors have been carefully taught but they do not respond freely.  Special attention should be paid to oral composition narration should be regularly practiced.  Arithmetical Tables should be thoroughly mastered in the lower standards.

INSPECTION REPORT  15th February 1924    73 present

Suggestions

1        It is a pity to see the organizations of classes, the comfort of teachers and pupils and incidentally the efficiency of the instruction held up for want of more suitable and better adapted accommodation.

2        Woodwork needs freshening up and wall decorations can be easily improved

3        Post the attendance roll (teachers) morning and evening

4        Two reading lessons simultaneously – even admitting one is a  silent lesson – as obtain here in each teacher divisions do not appeal to me.  But of course the conditions are against normal arrangements.

E Beamish

SHORT VISIT 6th June 1924

Called     48 present

DUNMINNING SCHOOL

GENERAL REPORT 20TH NOVEMBER 1924 

INSPECTOR:- F.G. BEAMISH

The assistant is untrained but is conscientious and hard working.  She takes charge of all the singing and drawing with tolerably good results and her work in connection with cookery and needlework is very highly appraised by the organizer.

In oral arithmetic, however, her junior classes need more intensive training and she should make a practice of getting full and confident oral answering habitually from the infant section.

The principal teaches on the main subjects of the programme in both divisions and secures creditable results together with a most pleasing disciplinary spirit.  Greater rhythm in Reading, keener attention to Grammar, and neater and more uniform written work are points to be developed.

REMARKS ON OTHER POINTS

A fireguard is needed in the Junior Room.

The inscription “NationalSchool” has not been altered and the inside paintwork needs renewal.

A globe and map of the locality are needed

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MOYASSET REPORTS

 

09/05/1923      Inspector J M Bradshaw

All subjects have been carefully taught.  The proficiency was uniformly good. In the upper the written work and arithmetic have improved. Nature study has been well taught but little knowledge of history was shown. The proficiency generally reached a fair standard.

20/03/1924    Report by W H Welphy

Keep the floor cleaner and attend to ventilation.  Pupils should not strew the classroom floor with lunch papers.   Reading should be slower. Aim at more intelligent reading.  Revise the tables in senior division and give much practise in mental arithmetic.
The floor is very dirty. I learn that it is only washed twice a year.

30/06/1928      Inspector Mr S Kirkpatrick

The work in this school continues to be conducted with commendable energy and the progress generally is quite satisfactory.  The building is worn out and poorly lighted and the surroundings are unattractive. The children are well trained and orderly.Remarks on other points:- The building is badly lighted badly situated and worn out.

TEACHERS:-  DAVID A PORTER and MISS J WATSON

19/11/1934      Inspector Mr Leslie Arndell

General statement by the inspector

The school house though recently repaired and decorated is hardly suitable. It is not well lighted and provides accommodation for only 73, yet there are 105 on rolls.

Both teachers are doing earnest, conscientious work and in spite of large classes and a poor attendance are achieving very creditable results and in commendable manner.

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TULLYGRAWLEY PRIMARY SCHOOL 
INSPECTION BOOK   

August 1859    School too small for attendance

August 1862 School too small

August 1863 House in good repair

June 1864  Strict order should be enforced.  Room too small.  A supply required , Ink, pencils and slates much needed 21/06/1871 A Roman Catholic child aged 6 years named Dan O’Boyle attended Religious Instruction without a certificate. The teacher is in training and thought as his older brother and sister attended without a certificate that in this case such was not wanted. Religious denominations should be fully written opposite each name in the register. Rolls should contain the religious denominations of each. All should be neatly kept Saturdays attendance should always be entered when school is open.
Teacher George Neely in Dublin training school, Andrew Moore is his  substitute. George Neely resigned 09/09/1871 Francis Speers  Appointed 11/09/1871

08/05/1872 The board has decided that the mother of a pupil cannot give a  certificate for Religious Instruction if the father is alive and available.

23/03/1874 90 pupils This is impossible to maintain proper order in a house too  much overcrowded.  Court rules to be obtained and suspended

02/08/1875  Visited incidentally  21/24 present at 11am. One absent marked present, and another boy attending for a few days  but not on roll counted in his place   Several pupils over age on the infants roll and several others on wrong class roll

Ed  MacCrednor ??

14/09/1877 The state of proficiency is extremely defective in all classes and   grants should not be continued unless decided improvement be  secured

09/09/1886  The teacher has discharged his duties durizg the past year with pretty  fair success and the proficiency of the pupils is considerably improved. The proficiency of Infant, First and Second classes is good of all the other classes bad in Grammar and Geography, and very  fair in other respects. Discipline and moral tone satisfactory.

Mr Starrit   District Inspector

22/09/1896 Sixty pupils were present at the Results Examination, and the fact  that all these had to be prepared in a room which affords   accommodation for only thirty-seven may account for some of  the defects which exist in the proficiency and organization of the school. The pupils are backward in Reading and Explanation, Grammar   and Agriculture, and many failed in Geography and Arithmetic also.   The written exercises are very deficient in neatness and cleanliness, and should receive greater attention during the next year. Fair progress has been made in Needlework since its introduction,   five months ago.  The demeanour of most of the pupils is dull and apathetic, and many   of them speak in a hardly intelligible manner.

Mr Cussen  District Inspector

24/09/1897 This school is not conducted successfully, and the pupils’ answering as well as their demeanour at the examinations gave little indication of intellectual development. The proficiency in Reading is very poor. Several pupils are unable  to read with accuracy, and few have a fair comprehension of the  subject-matter of the lessons. The proficiency in Writing, Grammar, and Geography is very poor. More attention should be paid to order and discipline.   It is very desirable  that the new school should be built as soon as possible, as the accommodation afforded by the existing house is   wholly insufficient for the number of pupils in attendance.

(Signed)  J S Cussen  District Inspector

Action Ordered On Report:- Manager is requested to admonish Mr Russell on the low proficiency of his pupils in Reading, Writing, Grammar and Geography.
28/05/1901 There were serious defects in writing of the 2nd and 4th standards   and in Arithmetic.  Reading is not clear and it is wanting in expression and intelligence.  The chief cause of the falling   off is the considerable increase in the attendance during the last   4 to 5 months of this period.
09/1904 Notes.  Neither of the teachers should take yes and no without Sir   or Miss for an answer.  A little perseverance by the teachers in this   will surely have a good result

J Mac Mohoney

1906   74 present

24/04/1913 W R Hughes  Little or on improvement has taken place during the past year except    that the children appear to be better under control.  They, however are  not as neat and tidy as could be wished.  The assistant should   endeavour both by precept and example to impress upon the juniors the    necessity of coming to school clean and neat.  30/01/1919 Whitewashing has not been done since 1913.  The out offices need   whitewashing

J M Bradshaw

02/04/1920 School is conducted with efficiency and in general a good standard   is attained by pupils.  Geography teaching in the senior division   and explanation of Reading lessons in the junior division need   increased attention. The teachers show more care and taste in the keeping of   this new vested school
M Mahon

09/07/1924 Remarks  The class room (gallery) is too small to accommodate one teacher   section of the school, the removal of the gallery and substitution of 9 dual desks would be a temporary improvement pending the  establishment of the new act. The inscription “National School” should be altered and boundary wall needs pointing.  The out offices need cleaning and deodorising   the playground should be kept free of weeds, a fibre doormat is  needed. There are no infant desks.

F G Beamish

19/09/1927 Remarks Classroom is too small. I understand the Regional Committee proposes to extent it.The gable wall of school needs to be  replaced in parts,  the coping of playground wall requires repair, the playground is rather muddy in wet weather. Two easels are needed,  there is no map of the British Isles.

J A Cole

Transcribed by Elizabeth Boyd